Happy birthday, Bloggers K!

Today we celebrate 2 years of the Bloggers Karamazov, the polyphonic blog-speriment of the North American Dostoevsky Society. Over the past two years, our blog has grown from something quite small to something with many readers (thank you, readers!).

Over the past two years we’ve worked to serve our community of Dostoevsky readers by: hosting online multimedia events (like #TheDoubleEvent), highlighting member research through book interviews (like these by Lonny Harrison or Deborah Martinsen and Olga Maiorova) and special research posts (like our most recent, by Susanne Fusso), cross-posting guest book bloggers (like Himadri Chatterjee or Steve Dodson), hosting thematic clusters (like this one about creating @RodionTweets or a series last summer where students discussed Dostoevsky cultural memory in the Dostoevskaya metro, Dostoevsky’s Petersburg, and Dostoevsky Day), reporting on special events (like this student production of The Crocodile, the epic Dostoevsky Games, or the Toronto library exhibit on Crime and Punishment), and more… this is just the tip of the iceberg, which ranges broadly from Ivan Karamazov weighing in on Dostoevsky’s writing to a how-to guide on 3D printing Dostoevsky bobble-heads.

BloggersK_birthdayAs our blog embarks on its third year, we are celebrating our work so far through social media posts that #tbt old content highlights.

We are also celebrating with a new design: birthday cards for sale to benefit NADS! Check them out here. 4 designs and each one sold helps support our outreach and scholarship initiatives.

And! We are also sending out a general call for posts on anything related to Dostoevsky.

  • Do you have an idea for a post or a post cluster?
  • Is there a movie based on a Dostoevsky novel you’d like to watch or revisit and write on?
  • Do you have some engaging Dostoevsky classroom exercises you’d like to share?
  • Are your students writing interesting papers on Dostoevsky?
  • Has reading Dostoevsky prompted you to make connections between things you hadn’t connected before?
  • Have you been to a play or reading or screening or exhibit related to Dostoevsky?

Let us know! You can always contact us with new ideas for posts.

Members, do you have a new Dostoevsky book out? Or are you planning a Dostoevsky event? We are glad to highlight members’ research and work. And if you’re not a member, but you’d like to be, you can always join up here.

Happy birthday, Bloggers K! Here’s to many more!

CFP: International Working Group on Dostoevsky and Religion

In partnership with the Brazilian Society on Dostoevsky, the Center of Religion Studies on Dostoevsky and Tolstoy (NERDT/UFJF) invites the entire academic community–researchers and students of national and international competence in the fields of religion, philosophy and Russian literature, and all the scope of researchers interested in literary and philosophical discussion on religion–to the I International Seminar on Dostoevsky and Religion. The event will take place on August 30th and 31st, at the Institute of Humane Sciences in UFJF, in the city of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais.

Connected to the Department of Religious Science and the Graduate Program in Religion Science at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora, NERDT intends to bring together researchers and proponents of international reach around the Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky and the texture of his dialogues with the religion. Therefore, we look at this meeting with a view to promoting this environment of reflection, debate and dissemination of the philosophical and religious universe present in the work and in the thought of this author.

There is a significant critical fortune that has focused on the religious dimensions of Dostoevsky’s life and work, ranging from classical commentators such as V. Ivanov and N. Berdiaev, to what Susan McReynolds has classified in the thematic dossier on “Dostoevsky and Christianity “of Dostoevsky Studies, as a global phenomenon of return of religion in the studies on Dostoevsky. In the context of Brazilian criticism, the works of Boris Schnaiderman and Otto Maria Carpeaux were the flowering ground of a critique on the relations between art and thought in Dostoevsky’s work. His work as a translator and critic, and his activity as a teacher and founder of the Department of Russian Literature and Literature of the University of São Paulo, was responsible for the formation of a generation of slavists who today carry out a fundamental activity of criticism and translation of Russian Literature in Brazil.

It is within this context of flourishing of studies on Dostoevsky in Brazil combined with the significant interest in the religious dimension of his work that we invite all those interested to participate in the I International Seminar on Dostoevsky and Religion.

Important names in contemporary research in Dostoevsky make up the lecturers board, such as Susan McReynolds (Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Havard University, Professor of Russian Literature, Department of Slavic Languages ​​and Literatures at Northwestern University), Maxim Shrayer (PhD in Russian Literature at Yale University, Professor of Russian Literature and Jewish Studies at Boston College), Bruno Barreto Gomide (Doctor of Literary Theory and History at Unicamp, Visiting Researcher at the Górki Institute of World Literature (Moscow), University of Glasgow, Puchskyki Dom (S. Petersburg, Harvard and the University of London) Professor of Russian Literature at the University of São Paulo; Luiz Felipe Pondé (PhD in Modern Philosophy at the University of São Paulo, Professor of Religious Studies at the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo) and Jimmy Sudário Cabral (Ph.D. in Theology at PUC-Rio and Université de Strasbourg; Professor of Religious Studies, Department of Religious Sciences at Federal University of Juiz de Fora).

In addition to the lectures, the event will have GTs (Working Groups), whose registrations are already open on the NERDT website (www.ufjf.br/nerdt). Entries for attendees are also available on the same website. Registration and proposals are due by July 31 2017.

CFP: Dostoevsky panels at MLA 2018

The MLA 2018 Convention will be in NYC this year (Jan 4-7). The International Dostoevsky Society has a guaranteed panel, which will be on this year’s MLA theme: “Dostoevsky and States of Insecurity.” The IDS may also propose two additional panels, the calls for which are as follows:

First Call: Dostoevsky and Conscience

The concept of ‘conscience’ is easily one of the most influential in the history of thought. It is also deployed frequently in the analysis of literary texts. However, the concept is often taken for granted both in literary studies and philosophy. This is especially troubling, given, as Paul Strohm recently put it, that “[c]onscience is a bit of a shape-shifter, remaining elusive in many of its particulars.” Dostoevsky scholarship is no exception, even though conscience plays a central role in his works. What, then, is Dostoevsky’s conception of conscience? Does he investigate multiple conceptions? How does his conception of conscience shape his fictional texts? What insights does his fiction provide for a more general investigation of the concept of conscience? This panel aims to explore these questions. Please submit abstracts of 300 words by March 10 to Dr. Brian Armstrong at barmstr3@augusta.edu.

367Second Call: The Idiot at 150

Dostoevsky’s second major novel, The Idiot, its associated with many superlatives: among his works, it is considered the most strange, most enigmatic, most difficult, and most problematic. It began serial publication in The Russian Messenger in January 1868, and so MLA 2018 is the perfect time to begin the sesquicentennial reflection on the novel. Please submit abstracts of 300 words by March 10 to Dr. Brian Armstrong at barmstr3@augusta.edu.


Please submit 300-word abstracts for all three panels to Dr Brian Armstrong (barmstr3@augusta.edu) by March 10.

Heading to AATSEEL this weekend? Check out these Dostoevsky panels and papers!

emilfilla_readerofdostoevskyx3We’re excited to host one of the new AATSEEL panel streams at the conference in San Francisco this weekend! Check it out for a diverse group of papers and roundtable discussions on Dostoevsky, his works, and the state of Dostoevsky studies. It’s called DOSTOEVSKY. And here’s the full line-up of Dostoevsky papers and panels … we’re looking forward to it!

Friday:

8am: our Dostoevsky Stream A panel: “Dostoevsky and the Law” in Powell II featuring papers by Gary Rosenshield (Raskolnikov, Lawgivers, and the Law), Richard Weisberg (Judicial Error, Novelistic Stress), and Erica Drennan (Miusov v. Monastery: The Other Trial in The Brothers Karamazov), discussion by Susan McReynolds and Amy Ronner

8am: on the “Mimesis in Russian Art and Aesthetic Theory” stream panel A in Stockton: Ilya Kliger presenting on “Imitating Pathos: Tragic Incorporation in Belinsky, Grigoriev and Dostoevsky.”

10am: on the “The Alchemy of Allusion” panel in Davidson: 2 papers. Irina Erman presents “The Specter of Achilles and the Spectacle of Svidrigailov’s Suicide in Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment” and Sidney Dement presents “Realizing the Future of Allusion: Dostoevsky Interprets Opekushin”

4:30pm: on the “19th-century Russian Women Prose Writers” panel in Cyril Magnin III: Anna Berman on “Plotting the Family and Failed Marriage Plots”

4:30pm: the panel 4-5 “Dostoevsky’s Ethics and Aesthetics” in Cyril Magnin I includes papers from: Thomas Dyne (“Знаю, что и вы обо мне там думаете”: the ethics of realism in Dostoevsky’s Bednye liudi), Giulia Dossi and Matylda Figlerowicz (Language as a metaphor for the human condition in Dostoevsky’s The House of the Dead and Eva Kantürkova’s My companions from the Bleak House), Alexei Pavlenko (Dostoevsky’s Heretical Christology), and Alina Wyman (Helpless Love in the Context of Revaluation of Values: Dostoevsky’s Frustrated Dreamers).

Saturday:

8am: our Dostoevsky Stream B panel in Fillmore with papers by Kathleen Scollins (Pronouncing the “New Word”: the Bronze Horseman Subtext of Crime and Punishment) and Katie Lane (The Art of Literary Creation in The Brothers Karamazov) and discussion by Robin Feuer Miller

8am: on the “Mimesis in Russian Art and Aesthetic Theory” stream panel B in Divisadero: Anastassia Kostrioukova on “Mimetic Art and Medicine: The Ill Body as a Challenge to Claims to Truth in Late 19th Century Russian Realism and Medical Knowledge”

3:15pm: on the “Silver Age Perspectives on the Golden Age” panel in Cyril Magnin I: Lindsey Ceballos on “Merezhkovskii’s Dostoevskian Response to Tolstoyan Death in “Smert’”

5:15pm: our Dostoevsky Stream C panel “Teaching Dostoevsky outside a Traditional Slavic Department” in Davidson: with Susan McReynolds, Katherine Bowers, Flavio Ricardo Vassoler do Canto, and Richard Weisberg.

Sunday:

9am: on the panel “Gogol and Dostoevsky” in Mission II: Irena Avsenik Nabergoj on “The “Ridiculous Jew” in Gogol, Dostoevsky and Cankar”


As always, you can join the discussion on Twitter – we’ll be live-tweeting on @DostoevskySoc and using the #AATSEEL2017 hashtag!

NADS/IDS logo design contest!

The North American Dostoevsky Society and the International Dostoevsky Society are at work on a new website. In celebration, we are holding a logo design competition! Entries are due by Sunday, Sept 11, 2016 to NADS secretary/treasurer Brian Armstrong (BARMSTR3@augusta.edu). The winning logo will be used on our websites, social media, and letterhead.

Please see the letter below from our presidents Carol Apollonio and Vladimir Zakharov for more details:


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Dear colleagues, 

Greetings from the North American Dostoevsky Society and the International Dostoevsky Society on the threshold of a new academic year! 

I write to let you know of plans to update our website. We have selected a designer and hope to have the site up and running by mid-autumn. This is an exciting step that will enable us to integrate our scholarly resources, outreach, and social media activities together in one location. 

We invite you to submit a design for a new logo for the site. The logo should be “joint but separable” for our two societies: NADS/IDS (North American Dostoevsky Society/International Dostoevsky Society); and, in Russian: МОД (Международное общество Достоевского).  

The winning entry will receive a free membership in IDS or NADS for the year 2017. 

Please submit entries to BARMSTR3@augusta.edu by Sunday, September 11. 

With best wishes, 

Carol Apollonio, President, North American Dostoevsky Society

Vladimir Zakharov, President, International Dostoevsky Society